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Reaching into the way-back files

Shrimp an economy food like hamburger? Apparently before WWII there was little regard for shrimp, and during the war it was promoted to fill in for shortages felt in routine home menus. Just one of the little tidbits found while reaching into back issues of the Cabot Star-Herald, Lonoke Democrat and Carlisle Independent.

Reading old newspapers and books often combines my interests in history and cooking. Through years of cruising flea markets and consignment shops, I have built up a fairly respectable library of old cookbooks (some 150 years old), and lots of locally produced cookbooks - one of my favorites is printed on construction paper and bound with yarn.

Archiving old newspapers (our morgue begins in 1871 with issues of the Prairie County Democrat - the forerunner of the Lonoke Democrat) opens the way recipe exchanges of more than 100 years ago. I have to be careful to discipline myself to cataloging when working in the back room.

The heritage cookbooks at Feeding America (http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/) is a real trap for me.

There have been many old recipes I have “discovered” or learned why they fell from grace. The Liver Loaf from 1918 was definitely not a do-again, but the 1878 pepper sauce is great.

Back on track - in 1981, the Cabot Star-Herald included “Star in the Kitchen,” a cooking column featuring individuals in the community. A few of those recipes are included today, as well as some selections from the wartime Carlisle Independent.

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April 10, 1981 - Cabot Star-Herald

This week we are “cleaning out the kitchen” so to speak. We have ended up with several recipes from previous Star in the Kitchen columns that we were unable to publish because of space limitations. Today’s column is devoted to those recipes.

DEER MEAT BALLS

2 lbs. deerburger

5 eggs

2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese

2 tablespoons bread crumbs

1 teaspoon basil

2 cloves garlic, chopped

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Mix ingredients well, form into walnut-size balls. Brown on all sides in oil.

-Darla Wilson

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MICROWAVE HEALTH BARS

1/2 cup butter or margarine

1 3-oz. pkg. cream cheese

1/2 cup dark brown sugar

1 cup whole wheat flour

1/3 cup toasted wheal germ

1 6-oz. pkg. chocolate chips

2 eggs

1/2 cup honey

1/3 cup whole wheat flour

1/3 cup instant nonfat dry milk

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1 cup chopped walnuts

Cream butter, cheese and sugar in bowl until light Add wheat flour and wheat germ.

Mix until smooth. Turn into waxed paper-lined glass baking dish. Cook in microwave 3 minutes, rotating dish 1/2 turn after each minute.

Sprinkle chips over it evenly. Heat for 1 minute until soft, Then spread.

Combine eggs and honey. Add remaining ingredients, Spoon over chocolate. Cook 6 to 8 minutes until almost done, rotating dish 1/2 turn every 2 minutes. Cut into bars when cool.

—Darla Wilson

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DOUGHNUTS OR CINNAMON ROLLS

2 pkg. dry yeast

1/2 cup warm water

1 teaspoon sugar

Dissolve yeast in warm water and sprinkle sugar over it, let dissolve.

3/4 cup milk

1/4 cup sugar

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup Crisco

Combine milk, sugar, salt and shortening and heat until lukewarm. Add the yeast mix- ture to this.

2 eggs

4 1/2 cups flour

To the mil, yeast, water mixture, add two eggs and beat well. Add 3 1/2 cups of the flour and beat thoroughly. Pour dough onto board and knead until smooth and elastic, using approximately one cup more of the flour. Place in greased bowl. Cover and let rise in warm place until doubled (about 1 1/2 to 2 hours) Knead down dough and roll out to about 1/2-inch thick. Cut with doughnut cutter. Let rise again for about 30 minutes. Then fry in deep hot Crisco until lightly brown. While warm, dip in thin mixture of confectioner’s sugar, milk and vanilla for the glaze. To make cinnamon rolls, roll dough thinner than for doughnuts. Spread with softened butter, cinnamon and sugar, Roll up jelly roll fashion, and slice into 1 inch rounds. Place in baking pan and let rise. Bake In 350- to 375-degree oven until golden brown. Glaze with powdered sugar, milk and vanilla glaze.

—Rena Jones

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ANGEL BISCUITS

1 package yeast

1/2 cup lukewarm water

3 tablespoons sugar

5 cups flour

1 teaspoon soda

3 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

3/4 cup Crisco

2 cups buttermilk

Dissolve yeast in lukewarm water with sugar. Mix together the dry ingredients and cut in shortening. Add dissolved yeast and buttermilk to dry ingredients. Mix well and store covered in greased bowl in refrigerator, pinch off amount needed and pat out on a flour- dusted board about 1/2-inch thick. Cut with biscuit cutter. Place on greased baking sheet and lightly oil or grease the tops. Bake 450° F about 10 to 12 minutes, or until brown. Makes approximately 4 or 5 dozen. Dough will keep in refrigerator at least a week.

— Rena Jones

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From the Carlisle Independent, April 9, 1942

Banana Chocolate Pudding

1 1/2 sqs. unsweetened chocolate

2 cups milk

3/4 cups sugar

5 tbsp. flour

1/2 teasp. Salt

2 egg yolks slightly beaten

1 tbsp. butter

1/2 teasp. Vanilla

3 ripe bananas

Use fully ripe bananas (yellow peel flecked with brown).

Add chocolate to milk in top of double boiler. Heat over rapidly boiling waiter until chocolate is melted. Beat with rotary eggbeater until blended.

Combine sugar, flour and salt, stir slowly into chocolate mixture.

Cook until well thickened stirring constantly. Cook ten minutes longer, stirring occasionally.

Stir small amount of hot mixture into egg yolks; then pour back into remaining hot mixture while beating vigorously. Cook one minute longer.

Remove from heat and add butter and vanilla. Chill thoroughly.

Place alternate layers of chocolate filling and ripe banana slices into serving- dishes, allowing 1-3 to 1-2 cup of filling and 1-2 banana for each portion, Serve garnished with whipped cream and additional ripe banana slices. Chop ped nut meats may be folded into chocolate mixture. 4 to 6 servings.

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The Poor Shrimp Turns Out To Be Very Rich Indeed

“Who’da thought it-that the little shrimp right out of it’s can could yield so much nutritious, right eating? … You who thought the shrimp was a charming social butterfly, better realize it’s an honest low-cost food when it’s in an economy dish like this:

Royal Shrimp

3 tbsps. butter.

4 tbsps. chopped green pepper.

3 tbsps. minced green onion.

4 tbsps. flour.

2 cups milk.

1 tbsp. lemon juice.

1 teasp. salt.

2 No.1 cans drained shrimp.

2 tbsps. chopped pimento.

Toast points.

Melt butter in sauce pan; add green pepper, and onion and cook until tender. Add flour, stir until well blended, and add milk. Cook, stirring constantly, until thickened. Remove from heat, add lemon juice, salt, shrimp and chopped pimento. Heat thoroughly and serve on toast points. Serves 6.

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